Get information on family violence, appropriate referrals, and tools to become a more informed bystander. Always confidential.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the "Where's the Line" campaign?

The campaign is designed to increase awareness of family violence and to change the behaviors of individuals who may be witnessing such acts. For the purpose of the campaign, we refer to these individuals as "bystanders."

The main objective of the campaign is to give bystanders in central Ohio a resource to safely and appropriately help victims.

What does family violence involve?
  • Child Abuse and Neglect — Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a child (under 18) by a parent, caregiver, or another person. While all types of abuse and neglect can occur, the four common types of child abuse are physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect.
  • Teen Dating Abuse — Any act that causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to a teen by an individual who is in a current or former dating relationship with that teen. Teen dating abuse may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal, or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.
  • Domestic Abuse — When an abusive family member or partner causes harm or threatens the risk of harm to an individual with whom they are in a trusted relationship. Domestic violence may be physical, sexual, financial, verbal, or emotional in nature. While abuse often occurs as a pattern of controlling behavior, a single episode of abuse is cause for concern.
What are bystanders encouraged to do?

If an individual believes that they are witnessing an act of family violence and they have questions, they are encouraged to call, text, or send an instant message for answers and advice that can help.

Using the campaign's telephone, text, or instant messaging options should never take the place of contacting 911 if it is clear that physical harm is happening or if it is about to happen.

What can a person expect when they call, text, or send an instant message?

The person can expect to receive information on family violence, appropriate referrals, and tools to become a more informed bystander.

Why is a campaign like this important and necessary?

Many victims avoid using the criminal justice system when experiencing family violence, for valid reasons. Because of this, a community response is necessary. Below are three common concerns that prevent bystanders from responding and several ways the campaign addresses those concerns.

  Fear
What if they come after me?
Uncertainty
What if I am wrong?
Privacy
That is none of my business.
Bystander Concerns
  • I worry that the abuser may find out if I call, and come after my loved ones or me.
  • I also worry that things might get worse if I call and stir things up.
  • I'm not confident that what I'm seeing is family violence.
  • I worry about what might happen if I'm wrong.
  • I'm not sure where to turn for advice.
  • I recognize that something is going on that looks like family violence. However, I don't want to be dragged into someone else's drama.
  • I think someone else will take care of it.
  • What happens in someone's home is none of my business.
What will be done to address these concerns? Reassure the bystander that calls, texts, and instant messages are confidential sources of support. Increase the bystander's familiarity with the signs of family violence and encourage them to call and ask questions. Educate the bystander about the impact and the difference their calls, texts, and instant messages can make.
What happens when a bystander calls, texts, or sends an instant message?

All calls, texts, and instant messages are confidential. The caller is greeted, and asked how they could be helped. Texts and instant messages will be answered as they are received, and are provided the link to our website for further information.

If the caller discloses there is immediate danger, the call will be transferred to 911. All efforts are made to provide the caller with the best response and appropriate resource.

Does a bystander have to give any personal information?

The person is asked for at least their zip code, but sharing information is completely optional and confidential.

Who receives the calls, texts, and instant messages?

The Information Coordinator (IC) at The Center for Family Safety and Healing manages the calls, texts, and instant messages.

The IC uses reliable information tools and resources to help inform and to safely report or provide information to those in need.

How is the Information Coordinator contacted?
  • By telephone 844-234-LINE (5463)
  • By texting 87028
  • By instant message at familysafetyandhealing.org

These options are available Monday through Friday between
9:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.

What is The Center for Family Safety and Healing?

The Center for Family Safety and Healing is a private non-profit that fully addresses all aspects of family violence, including child abuse and neglect, teen dating abuse, domestic violence, and elder abuse.

The Center for Family Safety and Healing
655 East Livingston Avenue, Columbus, OH 43205
(614) 722-8200